A public conversation: our trees and forests

£10.00

About trees & forests: a conversation

Wednesday June 19 20.00 – 21.30, Great Hall, Dartington TQ9 6EL

A conversation between Sir Harry Studholme (Chair of the Forestry Commission), Beccy Speight (CEO of Woodland Trust) and architect and broadcaster Piers Taylor (Invisible Studio Architects).

NOTE: If you are already registered for Evolving the Forest you do not need to book a ticket to this event.

 

21 tickets remain

SKU: public-conversation Category:

Description

A public conversation: our trees and forests

Wednesday June 19 20.00 – 21.30, Great Hall, Dartington TQ9 6EL

A conversation between Sir Harry Studholme (Chair of the Forestry Commission), Beccy Speight (CEO of Woodland Trust) and architect and broadcaster Piers Taylor (Invisible Studio Architects) about the future of forestry in the UK, why we love trees, and how we must learn to live differently with them.

Three of the most important voices in the UK in any discussion about how we live with trees, how we use them and how we love them. Sir Harry Studholme has been at the forefront of environmental thinking and policy-making for 2o years and in 2010 conducted the Independent Forestry Panel report on the future of the UK’s state-owned forests (with the Bishop of Liverpool) after the government announced plans to sell off the British state forests; Beccy Speight @WTBeccy spent many years with National Trust before joining the Woodland Trust as CEO in 2014. She, too, has been involved as a policy-maker in helping to shape how we view and respect our woodland and public spaces within nature. Piers Taylor @invisiblstudio is founder and CEO of Invisible Studio, a radical design firm that encapsulates Taylor’s illustrious and wide-ranging career as an architect and academic. Invisible Studio ‘aims to be a different organisation…; we operate through collaboration, experimentation, research and education. Probably best known as the writer and presenter of BBC2’s The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes, Taylor and Invisible Studio was also the subject of a recent (Jan 2019) feature in The Guardian.

Tickets are limited. Seats available in the balcony only (except to those with limited mobility).